RESEARCH SKILLS

Researcher  Development Programme 2017 – 2018

The workshops listed under this theme provide a wide range of skills and knowledge in becoming an effective researcher. They will allow you to directly apply new learning to your individual research project as well as refresh your skills in areas you are already familiar with.

Workshops

Induction - Beginning Your PhD: Getting off to a flying Start

A1A2 A3 B2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

Aimed at those starting their PhD, this session focuses on the early phase of the PhD process with the objective of ensuring participants get off to a good start.

The workshop will consider: the selection of a topic; identifying an argument and hypothesis; examining the role of the literature; the phases associated with undertaking a PhD; and how to plan and approach the thesis. The purpose of the PhD, and the range of skills required, will also be explored.

The session will then address participants’ training needs and identify sources of advice and guidance, including activities that can help ensure participants are able to make the most of their PhD experience: participating in conferences and research seminars, contributing to newsletters, e-bulletins, blogs, etc. The workshop will conclude with a set of recommendations for successful completion made by supervisors and examiners as well as recent PhDs, including the importance of having the right mind-set and an effective record keeping system.  Lastly, the session will contain information about the Doctoral School and the services we provide for PhD students, with added introductions from key services such as the Library and Student Wellbeing.

‘Lots of discussion opportunity’ – Hayley Robinson, Lincoln Institute of Health 

 

Benefits
  • Develop a clear understanding of the PhD process
  • Gain insights into approaches to planning your PhD
  • Appreciate the skills required and gained by a PhD
  • Consider the training needs and support sources
  • Ensure success in your PhD

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 10 October 2017, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Wednesday 8 November, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Thursday 7 December 2017, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Tuesday 6 February 2018, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now 
Thursday 10 May 2018, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now

Completing Your PhD

A1A2 A3 B2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

Aimed at final year PhD students, this session deals with the final phase of the process and explores strategies to help ensure successful completion.

Consideration will first be given to reviewing and evaluating work produced thus far, locating any remaining gaps, and formulating a plan for completion. Attention will also be given to strategies for good time management and the identification of effective working practices. This component of the workshop will draw to a close by exploring how to make the most of your supervisors in the final stage of the PhD, as well as considering sources of additional support.

The second half of the session will address the subject of editing your PhD – for consistency, for style and content, and for accuracy. This will also include preparing for the viva and, in so doing, will draw upon advice offered by examiners. It will conclude by reflecting upon the range of skills and capabilities gained from the PhD process, and how to prepare for post PhD life.

Benefits
  • Be able to review what you have so far achieved and plan for submission
  • Recognise what working practices and writing strategies best suit you
  • Gain insights into the editing process
  • Get good preparation for your viva
  • Reflect on the range of transferable skills acquired from undertaking a PhD
  • Consider your post PhD plans

Workshop Dates

Thursday 7 December, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now
Tuesday 27 March 2018, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Project Management for Researchers: Designing, Executing & Completing

A1A2 A3 B2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

A PhD is an excellent and unique, but also difficult, frustrating and time-consuming opportunity. Planning and managing your PhD effectively can make the process less stressful and will help you to finish within your allotted time.

Managing your own expectations and those of your supervisor can be challenging and it is important to frequently review your progress and discuss it. All PhD students must design and manage their own project, stick to a research plan, manage their time, present their work regularly and ensure that they are making sufficient progress.

This workshop will cover key stages in the PhD process and introduce participants to various digital tools and techniques that can be used to help manage your project. It will include a rough timeline from the start of your project to managing and preparing for your viva, and will cover subjects such as project management, working effectively with your supervisor(s), analysing your progress and thinking about the next steps in your career.

Benefits
  • Better manage your own, and your supervisor’s, expectations
  • Discover digital tools to aid project management
  • Consider timelines for your research

Workshop Dates

Wednesday 26th October 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Innovation & Design Thinking for Research: Ideation, Problem & Solution

A2A3B2D3
Facilitator: Joanna Young

About the Workshop

Design thinking is a novel technique that can be used to help plan your research and career effectively. The methods and processes involved encourage you to: think differently, develop ideas, and abstract away from traditional approaches to research. Participants will be asked to approach problems in a novel way, assess the results and iterate. First rate publications and successful research careers are not the preserve of a few brilliant individuals: the discovery process takes hard work, originality, iteration and refinement.

This workshop will introduce participants to the basic principles of design thinking and will include exercises to apply the methodology to their research, careers and project management. Participants are encouraged to come to the workshop with specific research-related “wicked problems” in mind. The workshop will include group work, individual reflection and class participation. All participants will be encouraged to interact as much as possible and they will be taken through the design thinking technique step by step.

Benefits
  • Learn the basics of design thinking
  • Apply said knowledge to your research
  • Consider its use across projects/careers

Workshop Dates

Monday 15th January 2018, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Conference and Events Organising for Researchers

C1D1D3
Facilitator: Joanna Young

About the Workshop

This workshop is designed specifically for staff and students who are interested in planning events, workshops or conferences. In order to deliver a high quality event it is crucial that organisers execute a sequence of well planned actions in advance, leaving plenty of time to solve any problems that arise unexpectedly. The workshop is designed to cover event planning and design, management, finance, venues, online tools, marketing and promotion, attracting sponsorship and post-event actions. Participants are encouraged to share their own event ideas throughout.

Benefits
  • Boost your profile
  • Develop new skills
  • Meet other academics in your field
  • Skills and knowledge gained transfer to roles and careers outside academia

Workshop Dates

Thursday 1 March 2018, 09:00 – 12:30 Book now

The Art & Science of Critical Thinking

A2A3B2D3
Facilitator: Caroline Broad

About the Workshop

The value and necessity of employing critical thinking skills has recently become the hot topic of conversation and rightly so. This workshop introduces participants to the core concepts and skills of critical thinking. We discuss the potential impact these skills can have on clarity of thinking, effectively communicating ideas, challenging others thinking, problem solving and decision making.

Benefits
  • Gain insight into the philosophical art of critical thinking
  • Grasp the notion of informal logic
  • Explore morality and critical thinking
  • Investigate the impact of common thinking fallacies
  • Challenge reason and assumption
  • Realise the impact of doubt and reflection
  • Implement critical thinking in communication

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 14 November 2017, 09:00 – 16:30 Book now

Real World Research: Applying Research Methods to a Contemporary Research Challenge

C1D1D3
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

This workshop will present participants with an opportunity to test and apply their knowledge of research methods to a contemporary and very real issue, and one likely to be familiar to many.

With this objective in mind, the session will begin with an introduction to the particular challenge – its history and character – as well as an exploration of why it requires attention and why it demands an improvement in our understanding. The scene having been set, participants will work in small groups to devise a suitable research design and identify an appropriate set of research methods capable of meeting this challenge.

The second part of the session will provide an opportunity for participants to assess and reflect on the ‘solutions’ they have devised. It will conclude with a consideration of the principles that underpin successful research practice.

Benefits
  • Consider how research methods are applied to a particular challenge
  • Gain an appreciation of how to develop a research schedule
  • Acquire an understanding of the principles that underpin effective research practice.

Workshop Dates

Wednesday 8 November 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now
 Thursday 8 March 2018, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Reflective Practices & the Research Process

A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesA3D2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

The research process, whether it is for a master’s dissertation or a PhD, can be very challenging. Consequently, approaches that are able to support this process are much valued. Reflective practice is one such approach. It can encourage the development of analytical skills and critical thinking, help generate new insights and understanding, and afford a mechanism for capturing the decision-making process. Reflective writing can also represent a data source in itself.

Introducing the concept of reflective practice and what it offers, this session considers the various methods that can be used to facilitate such practice, including journal keeping and reflective discussion. It then considers the components of a reflective cycle – from description to interpretation and critical analysis, and on to the identification of points of learning and the drawing up of a set of actions or responses.

Examples of how this process can be applied to the work of the researcher are also explored, with participants encouraged to draw upon their own study experiences. The concept of reflexivity, concerned with locating the researcher in the research process, will also be considered. The session will conclude with some recommendations on effective reflective practice and by encouraging participants to reflect upon the approach that best suits them.

Benefits
  • Gain an understanding of reflective practice
  • Acquire an appreciation of what this approach can bring to the research process
  • Explore methods of reflective practice
  • Consider examples of how reflective practice can support research work
  • Identify a method of reflective practice that best suits

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 21 November 2017, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Wednesday 14 March 2018, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now

The Life Story Interview

A1A3D2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

The life story interview has been described as a ‘research tool that is gaining much interest’. As a qualitative methodology it has the capability of generating rich, narrative data. Consequently, it is starting to be adopted across a number of disciplines. This workshop will begin by providing an introduction to the life story interview – the origins of this approach as well as its key characteristics. Attention will then turn to an exploration of its comparative strengths and limitations, before consideration is given to a case study illustrating its application. The next part of the workshop will explore techniques designed to maximise the quality of the data generated, including the role that the interviewer should play. The session will conclude with participants investigating how the life story interview – on its own or as part of a mixed methods approach – might be deployed in their own research work.

“Brilliant course as usual” – Emma Stanley, College of Science

Workshop Dates

Thursday 16 November 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Research Methods: The Focus Group in Academic Research

A1B2D1D2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

This session will examine the types of focus group used and their relative strengths and weaknesses. Drawing on examples of research projects, it will also consider when to use focus groups and the factors determining the number to conduct. A comparison with other forms of qualitative research, including interviews and observation, will also be made.

The session will explore the key phases involved in conducting successful focus group research. This will cover preparation work, including group selection, the development of a schedule of questions and the use of other data generating activities, before exploring the process of conducting the focus group. The workshop will conclude by exploring how other qualitative methods, as well as quantitative ones, can be used to complement the insights provided by focus groups, and the role that pilot studies can play in the testing of method and design.

Benefits
  • Appreciate the role of the focus group as a method of academic research
  • Recognise strengths and weaknesses of focus group research and when it is best applied
  • Consider which type of focus group would be most applicable
  • Appreciate the role of the pilot study in testing the focus group method and research design
  • Understand ethics in qualitative research and how these relate to focus group research

Workshop Dates

Thursday 21st November 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Research Methods: Interviews in Academic Research

A1B2D1
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

This session will examine the types of research interview available, and the strengths and weaknesses of each. Consideration will also be given to some of the more widely used approaches to qualitative interviewing and when each of these approaches is best applied.

The session will examine the key phases involved in the interview process, covering preparation work – including interviewee selection and pre-interview communication – before exploring the process of conducting the interview itself. Attention will be given to the role of the interviewer and practices for generating good quality data. The post-interview phase, including transcription, data interpretation and analysis, will also be addressed, along with the subjects of data storage, data protection and research ethics. The workshop will conclude by exploring how other methods can be used to complement the insights provided by interviews and the role of a pilot study in testing research methods and design

Benefits
  • Appreciate the interview as a method of academic research
  • Consider the best type of research interview and understand the key phases of the process
  • Find other methods that could be used to complement the data generated by interviews
  • Appreciate the role of the pilot study in testing interview methods and research design
  • Realise the importance of ethics in qualitative research with regards to research interviews

Workshop Dates

Wednesday 29 November 2017, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now

Research Methods: Observation & Photography in Academic Research

A1A3D3
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

Although less widely adopted than a number of other research methods, observation and photography can offer new perspectives and insights. By defining these methods in the context of qualitative research, consideration will be given to the different approaches that can be taken in applying each method, including in the role given to the subjects of the study. A range of academic studies have used observation or employed photography and here participants will explore what distinguishes each of these methods from other approaches to the collection of qualitative data, and what their comparative strengths and weakness are. Informed by these insights, participants will reflect on what method would be most applicable to their own research.

The session will also explore the concept of research design and how each of these approaches could be deployed to address a research question. Here preparation is needed, including gaining permissions as well as addressing wider ethical issues. Attention will then turn to the data-gathering itself, before the post fieldwork phase is explored. The latter will address data storage, as well as analysis and interpretation. The session will conclude by examining the role of the pilot study in developing an approach to using these particular methods, as well as exploring how observation and photography could be incorporated into a mixed methods approach.

Benefits
  • Recognise the potential of observation and photography
  • Explore these methods in previous research studies
  • Recognise the strengths and weaknesses of each method
  • Apply this method to your research project
  • Understand the phases of using observation and photography
  • Learn the principles that underpin effective research practice with regards to observation/photography

Workshop Dates

Thursday 8 March 2018, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now

Questionnaires: An Introduction and Overview

A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

Questionnaires – whether administered electronically or by more traditional means – are a widely used research method, including in the collection of qualitative data. This workshop considers the questionnaire, its context, and the kinds of data the questionnaire is capable of capturing. We will then explore the questionnaire structure: its layout and appearance; the ordering and types of question posed; as well as approaches to maximising response rates and ensuring validity in the data collected. In addition, consideration will be given to sampling techniques and guidance of questionnaire deployment.

Benefits
  • Consider the key elements of questionnaire
  • Understand the best circumstances to use them
  • Learn the strengths/weaknesses of this method

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 17 October 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now
Wednesday 29 November 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Questionnaires: Theory into Practice

A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

This interactive, follow-up session is aimed at those planning to deploy questionnaires in their research.

Drawing on examples of questionnaires used in the field, participants will work on developing their own questionnaires (either from scratch or from designs they already have). Questionnaires should be accessible to the recipients it aims to collect data from, and capable of generating the desired quality of response. As such, the workshop will review features that can maximise the potential of a questionnaire.

Benefits
  • Explore and evaluate your early questionnaire designs
  • Pilot the development of your questionnaire
  • Learn from existing examples in the research field

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 24 October 2017, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

Essay Writing for taught PGs

Facilitator: Judith Elkin

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 27 October 2017, 13:00 – 14:30 Book now
Wednesday 1 November 2017, 13:00 – 14:30 Book now

Qualitative Longitudinal Research: Concepts and Approaches

A1A2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

‘Conventional’ approaches to qualitative research have certain limitations. They tend to capture data at a particular moment in time. Whilst still new to a number of subject areas, qualitative longitudinal research offers an approach that has the potential to overcome this drawback. Having provided an introduction and explanation of what QLR encompasses, attention will turn to its potential advantages and strengths, as well as its limitations and the challenges associated with its application. Then some examples of QRL’s use in ‘the field’ will be given, with participants working in small groups to explore how it might be applied to a current area of concern to researchers. Concluding with participants considering how QLR could be deployed in their own research work.

Benefits
  • Understand what qualitative longitudinal research is and involves
  • Recognise the advantages and strengths of this approach
  • Appreciate the limitations and practical challenges associated with its use
  • Consider examples of its application
  • Assess the potential of this method in relation to your own research work

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 13 February, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now

The Collection & Analysis of Qualitative Data

A1A2C2
Facilitator: Neil Raven

About the Workshop

This session is aimed at students at the beginning of their PhD, with a lighthearted and positive approach to build your confidence and increase your understanding of what lies ahead. The session will provide general pointers on how you might manage your academic study, the pitfalls you might face (and how to avoid them!) and offer ideas on how to develop time management strategies.

Key academic elements of PhD study will also be covered, including what to consider when conducting fieldwork, analysing data and structuring the chapters of your thesis. Discussion will also cover your relationship with your supervisors, how you might approach writing up, what you can expect in the Viva and how it links to the thesis. The aim is to keep discussion informal, and from the perspective of what you as a PhD student can expect and how you might approach the challenges successfully.

Benefits
  • Understand what to expect during your studies
  • Develop general approaches to meet thechallenges ahead
  • Prepare yourself for the academic requirements of your PhD, working through each academic stage and planning successfully
  • Find guidance on your overall objectives and how each element of your PhD will contribute to the structure of the chapters in your thesis, and how the thesis links to the Viva

Workshop Dates

Thursday 6 February 2018, 13:30 – 16:30 Book now

About the Workshop

Aimed at those using qualitative methods in their masters and doctoral theses, this interactive workshop considers the application of these methods to the research question, alongside the process of data collection and data analysis.

The workshop will consider the characteristics of qualitative data and its value to academic enquiry. A series of case studies will feature, these will provide participants with an opportunity to explore the most appropriate methods and accompanying research design to apply in each case. Attention will then turn to methods designed to ensure the generation of high quality data. Explore the various phases associated with data analysis: the process of transcription and data preparation, organisation and interpretation, including the identification of themes and categories. Consideration will be given to expressing trends and tendencies, as well as recognising and working with the concepts of saturation and triangulation. Participants can then apply their learning to an excerpt from an interview transcript.

Benefits
  • Consider the characteristics of qualitative data
  • Realise the value of qualitative data to academic enquiry
  • Learn methods to ensure quality of data collected
  • The phases associated with data analysis – from transcription and data preparation, to data organisation and interpretation
  • Apply your learning to the analysis of an excerpt from an interview transcript

Workshop Dates

Thursday 16 November 2017, 10:00 – 12:00 Book now
Thursday 8 March 2018, 10:00 – 12:00 Book now

About the Workshop

This session is aimed at you as a student towards the end of your PhD, with a focus on the Viva Voce examination, where you will be asked to defend your academic arguments and your contribution to originality. The approach is discussed from the perspective of you as the student and what you can expect once you have submitted your thesis. It will discuss how you can prepare yourself for the final examination and make the academic shift from writing up to defending your thesis.

Alongside general planning, the discussion will cover all the academic stages of viva preparation, including the key research regulations you need to know, the appointment of your examiners, how to prepare for potential questions, how to deal with the examiners, understanding what will happen during the Viva itself, including the role of the Internal and External Examiner and the Independent Viva Chair. The aim is to keep discussion informal, and from the perspective of what you as a PhD student can expect and how you might prepare yourself both academically and generally to achieve a successful Viva.

Benefits
  • Learn approaches to prepare both academically and more generally
  • Outline the academic criteria the examiners will use to judge the thesis and Viva
  • Prepare for the Viva examination itself, including engage with the Independent Chair and theExaminers

Workshop Dates

Thursday 16 November 2017, 14:00 – 16:00 Book now
Thursday 8 March 2018, 14:00 – 16:00 Book now

Search Strategies for Systematic Reviews

A1
Facilitator: Academic Subject Librarian

About the Workshop

This library workshop is offering a guided introduction to finding information for your research work. Systematic reviews use transparent and replicable methods to locate, evaluate and synthesize all research relevant to a particular question. They are most commonly found in health, medicine and psychology. Therefore, this workshop will focus on developing a search strategy for identifying literature from these disciplines.

Benefits
  • Learn key features of the systematic review
    process
  • Identify appropriate databases, keywords and subject heading
  • Plan a search using the PICO and SPICE frameworks
  • Build an effective search strategy
  • Explore search techniques including truncation, wildcards and proximity operators
  • Translate searches across different databases

Workshop Dates

TBC For further information please join our waiting list

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About the Workshop

This workshop will aid you in building a search strategy that works, and will help develop your search techniques, including:

  • Online reference sources
  • Inter-Library loans (COPAC)
  • Index to theses/EThOS
  • Conference papers
  • Identifying and locating journal articles, newspaper databases
  • Compare journal
  • Current awareness service
  • Evaluating web-sites

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 24 October 2017, 11:00 – 12:00 Book now
Thursday 8 February 2018, 10:00 – 11:00 Book now
OpenAccessWeek_logo

Attend our programmed week of events advocating and promoting open access research and sharing information

Open Access Week: Monday 23rd – Friday 27th October 2017

Monday 23 October 11:00 – 12:30
E|mporium Postgraduate Journal Launch, University Library
A1D2
Monday 23 October 13:00 – 14:30
An introduction to Publishing and Metrics, Library, UL110 
A1D2
Facilitator: Marishona Ortega & Bev Jones 
[Book Online]
Tuesday 24 October 11:00 – 12:30
Storing & Sharing Research Data, Village Hall, VH0001
A1D2
Facilitator: Bev Jones
[Book Online]
Tuesday 24 October 2017 13:00 – 14:00
Open Access & Sharing Information, Library, UL110 
A1D2
Facilitator: Bev Jones
[Book Online
ORCiD Sign ups
  • Tuesday 24 October, 10:00 – 13:00, Isaac Newton Building
  • Thursday 26th October, 13:00 – 15:00 David Chiddick Building
  • Wednesday 25 October, 10:00 – 12:00, University Library
  • Friday 27 October, 10:00 – 13:00, AAD Building

About the Workshop

EndNote, a useful online reference management software, can ease the stress of handling seemingly endless amounts of citable reading and reference materials.

Benefits
  • Understand how EndNote can help you manage your references
  • Export and manually add references
  • Organise your references
  • Attach PDFs to your references within Endnote
  • Create a bibliography

Workshop Dates

Monday 23rd October 2017, 14:00 – 15:00 Book now

About the Workshop

This workshop is intended to aid those seeking legal information for their research. It will cover the main library resources available that contain legal materials and information useful for study.

Benefits
  • Be familiar with the main legal databases
  • Know how to search for cases and legislation using the legal databases
  • Identify authoritative legal information that is freely available on the internet

Workshop Dates

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Introduction to RefWorks

A1
Facilitator: Carole Bee 

About the Workshop

RefWorks, a useful online reference management software, can ease the stress of handling seemingly endless amounts of citable reading and reference materials.

Benefits
  • Use the software to help you manage references
  • Easily export and manually add references
  • Organise your references
  • Conveniently create a bibliography

Workshop Dates

Thursday 16 November 2017, 14:00 – 15:00 Book now
Tuesday 27 February 2018, 11:00 – 12:00 Book now

About the Workshop

There may be information within the cathedral library that could be used for your research. This tour includes the medieval Library of 1422 and the 10,000 rare book collection covers every subject imaginable, including homeopathy, philosophy, music, astronomy. There may be material within the libraries that would enrich your research, so please contact the Special Collections Librarian for

assistance. The modern reference collection can be consulted freely but manuscripts and rare books require an academic reference from your tutor.

Due to the medieval architecture, there is sadly no disabled access for the tour.

Workshop Dates

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Database Management Planning

A1
Facilitator: Bev Jones

About the Workshop

This workshop forms an introduction to the process of a search Data Management Plan (DMP): a formal document that outlines how you will handle your data both during your research, and after your research project has been completed. Learn about the purpose, benefits and structure of a DMP, and about some of the tools that can be used to create such plans.

Benefits
  • Understand the purpose and benefits of Data Management Plans
  • Appreciate how a DMP may apply to your own research project
  • Identify key elements in your project that should be recorded in a DMP
  • Discuss data management planning with your research supervisor
  • Locate and use planning tools including DMP Online

Workshop Dates

Wednesday 1 November 2017, 10:00 – 11:30 Book now
Thursday 11 January 2018, 10:00 – 11:30 Book now
Tuesday 29 May 2018, 14:00 – 15:30 Book now

Why Do I Need a P-Value?

A1
Facilitator: Phil Assheton

About the Workshop

In this interactive workshop, we will look at a very simple data-set in SPSS and see how a t-test saves us from making bad decisions in our research.

Benefits
  • Gain a deeper understanding of what a t-test, or p-values, really tell you
  • Explore data in SPSS
  • Practice running and interpreting a t-test and p-values

Workshop Dates

TBC For further information please join our waiting list

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Storing and Sharing Research Data

A1D2
Facilitator: Bev Jones

About the Workshop

This workshop is an introduction to some of the requirements, benefits, issues and problems involved in storing your research data. Students will be asked to consider funding requirements, institutional policies, technical, legal and ethical issues, and appropriate licences for sharing data, along with some of the tools that can be used to store, share and publish research data.

Benefits
  • Appreciate the benefits and risks involved in your approach to storing data
  • Discuss research data storage and sharing with your research supervisor
  • Make use of publicly shared and licensed
    data sets
  • Choose appropriate licences for your own data
  • Use the Lincoln Repository to formally publish data sets

Workshop Dates

Tuesday 14th October 2017, 11:00 – 12:30 Book now
Thursday 15 February 2018, 09:30 – 11:00 Book now

How to start analysing data in SPSS

A1
Facilitator: Phil Assheton

About the Workshop

In this interactive workshop, we will take a look at some real data from the General Social Survey, and build a set of steps for investigating that data. We will chiefly focus on different types of graphs and the p-values that can give those graphs credibility.

Benefits
  • Practically investigate actual data in SPSS
  • Determine what gives certain data credibility
  • Create steps transferable to your own practice

Workshop Dates

TBC For further information please join our waiting list

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How To Get My Own Data into SPSS

A1
Facilitator: Phil Assheton

About the Workshop

In this workshop, you will get the opportunity to enter some data from the General Social Survey into SPSS.  The data entered has been selected to expose you to the full set of features in SPSS’ “Variable View”.

Benefits
  • Learn how to set up your own data in SPSS
  • Get practical, hands-on experience of the process
  • Gain knowledge of the features of SPSS Variable View

Workshop Dates

TBC For further information please join our waiting list

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