PGR Students who Teach – Development Workshops

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The Lincoln Academy of Learning and Teaching (LALT), has announced a series of teaching and learning events to take place over the coming term.

These events are unique in offering discussion around university practice with senior teaching and learning figures, combined with practical advice and tips from current teaching staff in various disciplines.

If you are a Postgraduate Research Student who teaches you will be able to attend the workshops listed below. Please book onto the session via the instructions on the page.

Introduction for New Staff 10 – 11 am Tuesday 24 October
Giving Feedback Well 10 – 11 am Wednesday 1 November
Ensuring All Student Learn 10 – 11 am Monday 6 November
Marking Fast and Fair 10 – 11 am Tuesday 28 November
Briefing on New Module Evaluation Questions 12 noon – 1 pm Wednesday 29 November
Giving Feedback Well 3 – 4 pm Thursday 30 November
How to Get the Best from all Students 2 – 3 pm Monday 4 December
NSS Process and Expectations 1 – 2 pm Wednesday 6 December
Consultation Event on Possible Changes to Exam Board 10 – 11 am Wednesday 13 December

What every new researcher needs to know #Vitaechat

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What every new researcher needs to know #vitaechat

Whatever your situation, taking a professional approach to your development from the start can help make the path smoother, and enable you to be more successful in the long run.

During your doctoral or postdoctoral research you will push the boundary of current knowledge, increasingly becoming an expert in your field. However, being a professional researcher involves not just writing a thesis or papers, but also developing your skills and building your profile. So how do you make the most of your PhD or postdoc and prepare yourself for what’s coming next?

Our moderator will be joined by a panel of researchers at various stages of their careers to discuss what they wish they’d known when starting out. The #vitaechat will help you to answer questions such as:

  • As a PhD researcher, or postdoc in a new role, which first steps should I take?
  • How do I manage my relationship with my supervisor or PI?
  • How do I plan my research project and what are the typical milestones?
  • What kind of development opportunities will I have, and how do I prioritise them?
  • When should I start thinking about my post-PhD career?

Join us on the 19 October, at 12pm on the #vitaechat stream to discuss how to get started and to understand how to prepare yourself for undertaking your doctorate/new research project or new job

Register your interest HERE and you will be sent a reminder.

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Great Lives: Sir Mark Walport | 19th Oct

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Recently appointed Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation, Sir Mark Walport has long been a champion for science, engineering and technology within his career including his role as Government Chief Scientific Adviser, Head of the Government Office for Science and Co-Chair of the Prime Minister’s Council for Science and Technology.

Event Details: Thursday 19 October 2017, 11am for 11.30am lecture, Isaac Newton Lecture Theatre, University of Lincoln.

Continue reading “Great Lives: Sir Mark Walport | 19th Oct”

The School of Life Sciences Postgraduate Research Symposium

'Geoff' Image credit: Samantha Penrice, Associate Demonstrator, School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln.
‘Geoff’ Image credit: Samantha Penrice, Associate Demonstrator, School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln.

The School of Life Sciences postgraduate research symposium is being held in the Stephen Langton building on Wednesday 11th October from 1pm to 5pm.

“The postgraduate research symposium is a highlight of the research undertaken by current students in the School of Life Sciences, covering amazing science from the molecular sciences which study diseases to animal welfare and behaviour. Research students will be presenting their research as a mixture of selected talks and posters.”

Click here to download the full programme. 

For further information please contact Dr Stefan Millson: smillson@lincoln.ac.uk or Dr Anna Wilkinson: alwilkinson@lincoln.ac.uk

New research features in Journal of Experimental Biology

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The results of a fascinating new study by researchers from the School of Life Sciences are published today (17th August 2017) in the Journal of Experimental Biology

This Leverhulme-funded research, carried out by Dr Fernando Montealegre-Z, Dr Thorin Jonsson and Benedict Chivers, investigates a unique form of amplification in the sound generation system of a tropical bush cricket.

All bush crickets generate their acoustic mating calls through tegminal stridulation: the rubbing together of their specially modified forewings. A scraper (also known as the plectrum) is passed along a series of hardened teeth with the subsequent vibrations being amplified by specialised wing cells which act similarly to speaker membranes. However, the species in this study (the Neotropical bush cricket Acanthacara acuta) utilises an extraordinary bodily structure to further amplify its call through resonance.

The full story is featured on the School of Life Sciences blog, and the paper is available to read online.

Participants needed for exercise physiology research study

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“We are looking for healthy, active, male participants (aged 18-50 years), to take part in an exercise physiology research study within the School of Sport & Exercise Science.”

This study will examine some of the ways that the cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of submaximal and maximal treadmill exercise are currently determined, whilst providing you with information regarding your current fitness levels that may be beneficial to your training/exercise (i.e. maximum heart rate and aerobic capacity/fitness).

Involvement in the study will require just one visit to the Human Performance Centre laboratories between August and October to run on a treadmill across a range of intensities (i.e. gradually progressing from walking to maximum run speed) – with performance, physiological and psychological measures taken throughout. This will take between 60-75 minutes in total.

Continue reading “Participants needed for exercise physiology research study”