WRITING AND PUBLISHING

Researcher Development Programme 2018 – 2019

This theme focuses on the skills and knowledge needed in sharing and disseminating your research at all stages, from the conception of your writing to the findings and conclusions. The practical elements of writing and the opportunity to actually write are also covered.

Workshops

Navigating Peer Review: Challenges, Responses & Publishing

Facilitator: Dr Joanna Young A2B1C1D1

About the Workshop

All researchers will encounter peer review during their career, both as an author of research papers, books, fellowship applications or grants and as an expert who has been asked to review one of these documents. This workshop will introduce researchers to the peer review system, the process, the complexities, the responsibilities of the author and the reviewer and how to get the most out of the experience.

An awareness and knowledge of the peer review system is important so that early career researchers know what to expect when they submit their first research paper. Equally, understanding how to critically assess a research manuscript for quality, style, content, novelty and relevance gives researchers an insight into how cutting edge research is assessed and published. What should you look for in a manuscript? How can you optimise your chances of success as an author?

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the academic publishing and peer review system through short presentations, discussions and peer review exercises. The workshop is suitable for PhD students and early career researchers who are writing a manuscript for publication or who are interested in finding out more about the peer review process.

Benefits
  • Understand the editorial processes of peer-review
  • Get practical knowledge of what a review entails
  • Assess and gain awareness of what reviewers look for
  • Optimise your chances of peer-review success as an author

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Thursday 28 February 2019, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Getting your first Article Published

Facilitator: Dr Neil Raven A1B1C1D1D2

About the Workshop

Much importance is now attached to getting published. This session offers some practical guidance for publishing your research.

The workshop begins by asking: why publish – what are the reasons for publishing and what are the benefits of doing so? Attention will then turn to journal selection and where to publish, before the question of how to get published is addressed. Here consideration will be given to the writing stage – the steps involved and the need to think about the journal’s readership. The subjects of article structuring and referencing, as well as preparing the final manuscript, will also be examined.

The session will then turn to the submission process, including the writing of covering letters, before consideration is given to dealing with feedback, including handling revisions and managing possible rejections. The session will finish with some recommendations from those ‘in the know’, amongst them journal editors, as well as suggestions on the intermediate steps that can be taken to support the successful submission of your first article, including writing for newsletters and contributing to blogs and e-bulletins.

Benefits
  • Explore the reasons/motivations for publishing
  • Learn the stages of preparing a paper for publication
  • Consider how to structure an academic article
  • Explore submission process and handling feedback
  • Consider a range of recommendations for success in getting published

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Wednesday 23 January 2019, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now

Critical Reading and Writing for Research Students

Facilitator: Professor Anne Rixom A2

About the Workshop

This session is aimed at you as a student at the beginning of your PhD or Research Master’s degree, as you begin to develop your academic reading and writing skills and experience. The ability to critically analyse academic papers and journals is fundamental to postgraduate research students so that you can understand what the literature is telling you about your research topic. In addition, you need to also be able to express your own arguments clearly and concisely, so good academic writing is a necessary skill to develop as you progress through your degree.

The session will provide general pointers on how you might approach the literature, and offer suggestions and techniques on managing large amounts of complex information in a meaningful way. Discussion will cover how you interpret the key arguments in the papers or journals, how you annotate the main themes from the authors for your references, and then how you use this evidence to support your own academic writing. Guidance on structuring strong academic writing and referencing will also be covered, including writing abstracts, outlines and papers.

Benefits
  • Increase your understanding of what the term ‘criticality’ means in academic reading and writing, and why it is fundamental
  • Provide guidance on how you can manage your reading resources and references, so you store and use them appropriately and effectively
  • Develop an approach to clear and concise academic writing, and how it can be structured to support your argument

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Monday 12 November 2018, 1 – 3pm Book now
 Monday 4 March 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now
Tuesday 11 June 2019, 10:00 – 12pm Book now

Academic Writing for the Thesis

Facilitator: Professor Anne Rixom A2

About the Workshop

This session is aimed at you as a student towards the end of your PhD, as you have completed your research and are approaching the ‘Writing Up’ phase of your thesis. Discussion will focus on how you can express yourself concisely and with clarity in your narrative, and how you reflect your research in the thesis. Guidance will be offered on what constitutes strong academic writing and will link this specifically to your thesis, by offering approaches to take your reader through the logical narrative of your argument and how it is supported by the evidence.

Discussion will also cover a typical thesis structure in terms of the chapters and how they link together into a single piece of work. Guidance will be given on strong academic writing and how it contributes to the thesis, so that your reader is clear on what you are trying to say. This will be linked to the criteria for Doctoral degrees which will be used by the examiners to assess your thesis. The session will also include the key research regulations you need to know, and how the thesis links ahead to the Viva.

Benefits
  • Increase your understanding of how a Thesis is structured and its primary purpose in supporting your hypothesis
  • Outline the academic criteria the examiners will use to judge the thesis in terms of its core research question, structure and logical narrative
  • Offer guidance on how you might develop strategies for ‘Writing Up’ and how you can draft chapters in the most effective way

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Tuesday 13 November 2018, 10:00 – 12:00 Book now
 Tuesday 5 March 2019, 10:00 – 12:00  Book now
Tuesday 11 June 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now

Writing a Literature Review

Facilitator: Dr Neil Raven A1A3C2D2

About the Workshop

The writing of a literature review can seem a daunting prospect. This workshop aims to overcome such fears.

The session begins by exploring the concept and purpose of the literature review and where it fits into the PhD thesis. The key question of what makes a good review will also be addressed. Attention will then be given to the development of a research plan for undertaking a successful review. This will include a consideration of information sources and search strategies.

The second part of the workshop will explore approaches for effective note taking and referencing, with consideration also given to the critical analysis of secondary sources. The structuring of a literature review and the integration of material will also be examined. The workshop will conclude with a look at writing styles and strategies for overcoming the challenge of starting the writing process.

Benefits
  • Appreciate the role and purpose of the literature review within the PhD thesis
  • Recognise what makes a good literature review
  • Understand how to develop a research plan
  • Understand how to critically analyse sources
  • Gain insights into structuring a literature review
  • Recognise appropriate writing styles and be ready to start the writing

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Wednesday 14 November 2018, 1 – 4pm Book now
Thursday 24 January 2019, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Thesis Writing Bootcamp: Planning, Finishing & Pitfalls

Facilitator: Dr Joanna Young A1A2B1B2

About the Workshop

This half day workshop explores the practicalities of thesis writing,
including planning techniques, appropriate writing style and how to make writing more productive. At the start of the workshop, students are encouraged to share and discuss the challenges associated with writing, before we start discussing structure and expectations.

A variety of writing and productivity techniques are introduce and this is complemented by a discussion of software tools that can be helpful. A section on data presentation is also included and examples of good figures are used to illustrate best practice. By the end of the workshop, students will have a clear understanding of what is required of their thesis, they will have initiated their writing, considered the potential pitfalls and know how to avoid them and started to design a writing strategy that works for them.

Benefits
  • understand the working structure of a thesis;
  • develop a greater awareness of the different stages of the
    writing process;
  • be introduced to techniques for planning your writing &
    being productive;
  • explore how to manage their thesis writing so as to make better use of the time, resources and technology available;
  • increase your understanding of the pitfalls of thesis writing,
    and how to avoid them.

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Thursday 22 November 2018, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Plagiarism & Academic Misconduct

Facilitator: Jonathan Cooper A1

About the Workshop

This session is designed to help you understand what is meant by plagiarism and academic misconduct, why it is taken so seriously, how it is possible to inadvertently commit misconduct, and how to avoid falling into the trap of inadvertently behaving unethically. Initially looking at the different forms of academic misconduct including plagiarism, cheating, fabricating data and behaving unethically, consideration will then be given to identifying plagiarism in written work, and considering the Turnitin system in helping prevent plagiarism. The session then moves on to a discussion of what constitutes ethical research and concludes with a review of unethical behaviour in research, with specific reference to data collection and analysis.

Benefits
  • Consider the various forms of “academic misconduct”
  • Understand the consequences of being found guilty of academic misconduct
  • Avoid accusations of plagiarism through correct citation and referencing

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Wednesday 5 December 2018, 10:00 – 12:00 Book now
Thursday 7 March 2019, 2 – 4pm Book now

Productive Writing: Techniques, Planning & Finishing

Facilitator: Dr Joanna Young A1A2B1B2

About the Workshop

How do you initiate the writing process when faced with only a
blank page or a cursor incessantly blinking on the screen? Effective written communication is an essential part of academia and researchers are required to write a variety of documents including proposals, theses, papers for publication, grant proposals and books. Manuscripts must be clear and concise and written in a manner that is appropriate for that particular style of document. Scholarly writing projects involve planning, drafting & redrafting, setting deadlines and collaboration.

This workshop will focus on how to start writing, how to keep going and how to finish. We will cover different styles of documents, language and the academic writing style, in addition to how to plan your writing and a short introduction to new collaborative writing tools.

The workshop will include writing exercises, advice on making
writing part of your working routine and a short section on dealing
with and providing feedback.

Benefits
  • be introdcued to a range of writing productivity techniques;
  • plan out a manuscript from scratch;
  • discuss various writing challenges with your peers;
  • initiate a workplan & set deadlines for your writing project.

Request Online Recording









Workshop Dates

Thursday 31 January 2019, 1.30 – 4.30pm Book now

Writing a Great Conference Abstract

Facilitator: Dr Neil Raven A1D2D3

About the Workshop

Whilst much academic writing, including the PhD itself, is associated with long pieces of work comprising many thousands of words, there is value in being able to complement this skill with more concise writing. This ability is required in preparing abstracts, providing a concise overview of a larger study. Whilst they often accompany articles, abstracts are increasingly used in the selection of conference and seminar papers. Consequently, there is much value in being able to master the skill of writing abstracts.

This workshop begins by identifying the characteristics that distinguish a conference abstract from one that would accompany an article, and the purposes it serves. It then considers the typical format and key components of a conference abstract, before exploring what makes a great abstract, and providing a range of tips for writing a successful conference abstract. In the final part of the workshop, focus will turn to supporting participants in planning and preparing their own abstract.

Request Online Recording









Join Waiting List







Think Pieces: Getting your Research Recognised

Facilitator: Dr Neil Raven A1A3B3D1D2D3

About the Workshop

Think pieces, sometimes also referred to as opinion or viewpoint pieces, represent a form of writing that is gaining academic recognition and is now used across a number of disciplines. While exact definitions vary, the views of the author will, typically, be at the forefront of what is expressed, with the aim of provoking thought and encouraging debate and discussion. Think pieces also tend to be shorter in length than conventional academic articles. Yet, whilst they might appear in journals and conference publications, think pieces have a potentially broader application, since they can also be found in newsletters, e-bulletins and blogs, with the aim of reaching a wide audience. They therefore offer the opportunity to acquire an early publication and to generate valuable feedback.

This workshop begins by exploring the character, purpose and value of the think piece, before considering the structure and preparation associated with the writing process. The workshop’s focus will then turn to supporting participants in planning and preparing their own think piece.

Those wishing to attend this workshop are expected to have given some initial consideration to a subject associated with their research that would be suitable for developing into a short paper.

Benefits
  • Gain an understanding of the nature and character of a think piece
  • Explore the think piece as a form of academic writing
  • Consider the role and value of the think piece to your development as a researcher
  • Appreciate how to plan and structure a short article of this nature
  • Prepare an outline for a think piece of your own

Request Online Recording









Join Waiting List







What Should a Literature Review Do?

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesD2   

About the Workshop

Every thesis must include a review of relevant literature. Indeed, conducting a literature review is often the first thing a PGR student is asked to do. This session discusses the purpose of this literature review and the importance of summarising, analysing and synthesising the arguments of others as a means of providing a context for your own research. It also considers some alternative models for writing and structuring a literature review chapter. Understanding your research ‘field’, and being able to guide your reader around it, are very important first steps on the road to doctoral success. This session is designed to facilitate that process.

The session was brilliant in terms of focusing my attention on engaging with the relevant literature in a structured and critical way, and also how to position my review in terms of my research, rather than being governed by the literature (Staffordshire).

Request Online Recording









Writing Effectively

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities   

About the Workshop

This session will consider the basic elements of effective academic writing and how they can be combined to ensure the best chance of success. Issues covered will include preparation (targeted literature reviewing, taking a ‘stance’ as an author, the creation of a writing plan or preliminary draft), the task of writing (having clear aims, order and structure, signposting, guiding the reader, drafting), writing style (the achievement of clarity and simplicity) and the need for a clear, logical and straightforward conclusion or ‘take-home’ message. The session will also provide an opportunity to discuss writing issues specific to particular disciplines or students. This session represents over a decade of academic writing experience packed into two hours, so please come along and take advantage!

I feel so much more confident about starting to write. Thank you for explaining about starting from the desired end point and working back, that makes so much sense. And the outlining, planning, and building advice has taken the fear out of breaking the blank page (East Anglia).

Request Online Recording









Introduction to Academic Writing

Facilitator: Kevin Byron A2B2B3

About the Workshop

Writing is an essential skill for doing any kind of research, and contrary to the belief in some quarters that studying for a Ph.D consists of a period of doing research followed by a period of writing, the requirement to write appears at all stages in the cycle of activity that defines research. This cycle begins with the identification of gaps or discontinuities in knowledge, the articulation of these gaps, and how they may be filled as research questions or hypothesis. The cycle ends (and a new one begins) with the communication – more often through the written word in academic journals – of the new knowledge aiming to address these research questions, how this knowledge was acquired, and how it relates to the overall progress in the specific field of interest. Writing is a process of continuous improvement irrespective of the starting point, and the earlier one engages with acquiring the various skills for writing, the more efficient and productive one will be as a researcher.

This workshop will equip early stage Ph.D and M.Res students with some of the tools and techniques that can help in developing the writing skills for doing research.

Benefits
  • prepare concise and logically-written materials
  • write at different levels — brief abstract to the basic elements of an academic paper
  • use logical argument in writing to persuade others
  • explain complex, difficult concepts in basic terms & language
  • analyse the different styles & conventions in published materials
  • develop ‘the researcher voice’ through a synthesis of published literature

Request Online Recording









Join Waiting List







Writing your First Academic Paper

Facilitator: Kevin Byron A2B2B3

About the Workshop

In the design stage of a Ph.D or M.Res, the research methods and the means for acquiring new knowledge in the field of study are developed. When the design is complete and put into action, evidence may begin to emerge that addresses the research question articulated earlier. This may appear for example as the results of experimental investigations, or data gathered through surveys or interviews. If the new knowledge appears to provide answers to the research question and is an original contribution to the field of study, the next step is in communicating this knowledge to the wider research community through writing a paper for publication in an academic journal. Having read many such publications in the first stage of embarking on the research project (and thereafter), making the transition from reader to author can be a daunting task.

This workshop is aimed at guiding the researcher through this transition by providing some tools and techniques that can help in writing academic papers, and providing some ways of overcoming obstacles to writing.

Benefits
  • see how the quality of academic publications is controlled
  • choose an appropriate journal and style for a paper
  • spproach writing the different sections of a paper, and the order in which to write them
  • incorporate reviewers’ comments in a peer-reviewed paper
  • gain a set of strategies for overcoming common barriers to writing

Request Online Recording









Join Waiting List







Academic Publishing

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA D2   

About the Workshop

This session will introduce and discuss the practicalities of academic journal publishing. Various means for choosing a target journal will be considered, as will the mechanics of writing an effective paper (including a summary of the aims of each section of an academic report). Strategies for dealing with reviewer comments will also be considered at some length and opportunity will be provided to look at the response-to-reviewer letters of experienced academics. Time will also be made available for questions.

This has been a really great and informative session. It explains academic publishing in an accessible and clear way – extremely, extremely, helpful. Thank you so much (Royal Holloway).

Request Online Recording









Publish or Perish: Academic Publishing in a Nutshell

Facilitator: Dr Joanna Young A1B1C1D1

About the Workshop

Publishing your work and sharing your findings is a key component of a successful research career. A significant time investment is required to successfully publish a paper and several skills are used during the process including collaborative writing, figure design, analysis and concise written communication. With 30,000 journals and various publishing models to consider, researchers need to be aware of which option will work best for them. Academic publishing is currently undergoing a revolution and there have been several new developments in recent years, including the rise of open access journals, the requirement to share data, and new regulations. Participants will be introduced to the editorial process, various publishing models, open access publishing, legal considerations and how to navigate the process. This workshop is designed to cover the key actions and issues behind publishing a research paper, including manuscript preparation, choosing the appropriate journal and peer review. In addition it will include an introduction to the controversial subject of metrics. The instructor’s own publishing experience will be used to illustrate key points.

Benefits
  • Get a preliminary insight into academic publishing
  • Understand editorial process
  • Explore the steps of publishing your own paper

Request Online Recording









Join Waiting List







Preparing to Publish: A Writing Workshop for Researchers

Facilitator: Dr Neil Raven A2B2B3

About the Workshop

Writing is an essential component of life as a postgraduate – whether it is for the production of reports, the preparation of the thesis, or the penning of an article for publication. However, starting the writing process, or completing your first draft, or preparing the finished version, can be far from easy and straightforward. This workshop provides a forum for those facing such challenges. Interactive in nature and supportive in approach, it begins with each participant determining the stage they have reached in their writing, and where they would like to be. Consideration is then given to a ‘decisional balance sheet’ when it comes to making writing progress, before attention is turned to the barriers impeding this progress and tactics for overcoming these challenges. The second half of the workshop will focus on the development of suitable and meaningful writing goals and the identification of strategies for relapse prevention. It will conclude with each participant turning their particular set of writing goals into a realistic and implementable plan of action!

Benefits
  • Gain an awareness of the stage you are at in your writing
  • Consider your motivations for making progress in your writing
  • Explore the barriers to writing you face and tactics for overcoming these
  • Develop a set of writing goals
  • Identify strategies for relapse prevention
  • Compile an action plan for achieving your writing goals.

Request Online Recording









Join Waiting List







Writing & Structuring an Effective Thesis

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA C2   

About the Workshop

This session, as the name suggests, will focus on the writing – style, structure and presentation – of an effective PhD thesis. Using examples throughout, attendees will be shown how to access relevant exemplar theses in their subject area and issues covered will include the overall chapter structure, the aims and presentation of specific chapters (including the introduction, literature review, theoretical/methodological chapters, study chapters, and general discussion), and the manner in which they might or should be combined to create an effective and impactful thesis. The need to create a single ‘golden thread’ or ‘guiding narrative’ for the thesis will also be emphasised. Writing an 80-100000 word document is very difficult indeed and this session is designed to help break the task into manageable chunks.

The main strength [of this session] was its applicability across disciplines…This improves my understanding of what a thesis should do [and] the section by section explanations you provide are fantastic (Leeds Trinity).

Request Online Recording









Dare to Enjoy: Writing Retreat

A1A3B2C2
Facilitator: Will Medd

About the Workshop

Writing is a huge part of research and yet, as a skill, the focus of training is often placed on how to produce scientific papers, while retreats tend to focus on blocking out the time and space to write – both equally great and important. What about the experience of writing itself? How can researchers learn to be productive, to keep writing and even enjoy the process?

“Dare to Enjoy!” offers a combination of a ‘retreat’ to create space to write, and live coaching ‘experiments’ to explore different approaches, to the experience of writing. While working on a current piece of writing (a paper, proposal, etc.), it aims to explore what happens if you unlock the possibility of enjoying writing! The workshop explores confidence, fears, values, goals and habits while experimenting with different writing moods.

Benefits
  • Dedicate time to writing on your topics.
  • Gain awareness of what gets in the way of your writing and how to overcome that
  • Learn from others about their writing experiences and strategies
  • Commit to new writing habits

Join the Waiting List








Microsoft Word for Long Documents & Dissertations

Facilitator: Hope Williard, Academic Subject Librarian A1D2

About the Workshop

This workshop will teach you tips and tricks to make the most out of Word for your dissertation or other long document.

Benefits
  • Structure a document into sections (abstract, methods section, chapters, etc.)
  • Create and manage headers and footers, including page numbers
  • Use footnotes or endnotes for referencing and create a bibliography
  • Create and manage tables of contents and tables of figures
  • Use outline view to manage your document

Join the Waiting List








Introduction to RefWorks

Facilitator: Academic Subject Librarian A1C2

About the Workshop

Learning Outcomes
  • Understand how RefWorks can help you manage your references
  • Export and manually add references
  • Organise your references
  • Create a bibliography

Join the Waiting List








Introduction to EndNote

Facilitator: Carole Bee A1C2

About the Workshop

Learning Outcomes
  • Understand how EndNote can help you manage your references
  • Export and manually add references
  • Import references from PDF
  • Organise and edit your references
  • Add citations and create a bibliography in a Word document
  • Edit your citations
  • Create a bibliography

Join the Waiting List








About the Workshop

The library currently delivers a number of academic development workshops specifically for postgraduate research students around referencing. These workshops will provide a detailed introduction to specific referencing formats within the university’s style guide.

Benefits
  • Recognise why you need to reference
  • Understand when you need to give a reference
  • Be able to identify the main sources of information
  • Know how to insert and present footnotes in a Word document
  • Understand the difference between a footnote reference and the list of sources at the end of your academic work• Create a reference list/bibliography following the University of Lincoln’s Harvard style

Join the Waiting List








About the Workshop

The library currently delivers a number of academic development workshops specifically for postgraduate research students around referencing. These workshops will provide a detailed introduction to specific referencing formats within the university’s style guide.

Benefits
  • Recognise why you need to reference
  • Understand when you need to give a reference
  • Be able to identify the main sources of information
  • Know how to insert and present footnotes in a Word document
  • Understand the difference between a footnote reference and the list of sources at the end of your academic work• Create a reference list/bibliography following the University of Lincoln’s Harvard style

Join the Waiting List








About the Workshop

The library currently delivers a number of academic development workshops specifically for postgraduate research students around referencing. These workshops will provide a detailed introduction to specific referencing formats within the university’s style guide.

Benefits
  • Recognise why you need to reference
  • Understand when you need to give a reference
  • Be able to identify the main sources of information
  • Know how to insert and present footnotes in a Word document
  • Understand the difference between a footnote reference and the list of sources at the end of your academic work• Create a reference list/bibliography following the University of Lincoln’s IEEE style

Join the Waiting List








About the Workshop

The library currently delivers a number of academic development workshops specifically for postgraduate research students around referencing. These workshops will provide a detailed introduction to specific referencing formats within the university’s style guide.

Benefits
  • Recognise why you need to reference
  • Understand when you need to give a reference
  • Be able to identify the main sources of information
  • Know how to insert and present footnotes in a Word document
  • Understand the difference between a footnote reference and the list of sources at the end of your academic work• Create a reference list/bibliography following the University of Lincoln’s Vancouver style

Join the Waiting List








About the Workshop

The library currently delivers a number of academic development workshops specifically for postgraduate research students around referencing. These workshops will provide a detailed introduction to specific referencing formats within the university’s style guide. The MHRA referencing style is predominantly used by English related subjects within the School of English and Journalism.

Benefits
  • Describe a ranged of situations which require a reference and to explain the reasons and importance of referencing.
  • Be conversant with the footnote and bibliography components of MHRA referencing
  • Identify a range of primary and secondary sources and reference them in the MHRA style.

Join the Waiting List








About the Workshop

The library currently delivers a number of academic development workshops specifically for postgraduate research students around referencing. These workshops will provide a detailed introduction to specific referencing formats within the university’s style guide.

Benefits
  • Recognise why you need to reference
  • Understand when you need to give a reference
  • Be able to identify the main sources of information
  • Know how to insert and present footnotes in a Word document
  • Understand the difference between a footnote reference and the list of sources at the end of your academic work
    • Create a reference list/bibliography following the University of Lincoln’s OSCOLA style

Join the Waiting List