RESEARCH SKILLS

Researcher  Development Programme 2018 – 2019

The workshops listed under this theme provide a wide range of skills and knowledge in becoming an effective researcher. They will allow you to directly apply new learning to your individual research project as well as refresh your skills in areas you are already familiar.

Workshops

Doctoral School Induction - Beginning Your Research: Getting off to a Flying Start

Facilitator: Neil Raven    A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesA3B2

About the Workshop

Aimed at those starting their PhD, this session focuses on the early phase of the PhD process with the objective of ensuring participants get off to a good start.

The workshop will consider: the selection of a topic; identifying an argument and hypothesis; examining the role of the literature; the phases associated with undertaking a PhD; and how to plan and approach the thesis. The purpose of the PhD, and the range of skills required, will also be explored.

The session will then address participants’ training needs and identify sources of advice and guidance, including activities that can help ensure participants are able to make the most of their PhD experience: participating in conferences and research seminars, contributing to newsletters, e-bulletins, blogs, etc. The workshop will conclude with a set of recommendations for successful completion made by supervisors and examiners as well as recent PhDs, including the importance of having the right mind-set and an effective record keeping system.  Lastly, the session will contain information about the Doctoral School and the services we provide for PhD students, with added introductions from key services such as the Library and Student Wellbeing.

‘Lots of discussion opportunity’ – Hayley Robinson, Lincoln Institute of Health 

 

Benefits
  • Develop a clear understanding of the PhD process
  • Gain insights into approaches to planning your PhD
  • Appreciate the skills required and gained by a PhD
  • Consider the training needs and support sources
  • Ensure success in your PhD

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 14th Nov 2018, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Wednesday 12th Dec 2018, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Wednesday 13th Feb 2019, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now
Wednesday 10th May 2019, 09:30 – 12:30 Book now 

Surviving Your PhD!

Facilitator: Professor Anne Rixom A1B1B2C2

About the Workshop

This session is aimed at you as a student at the beginning of your PhD, with a lighthearted and positive approach to build your confidence and increase your understanding of what lies ahead. The session will provide general pointers on how you might manage your academic study, the pitfalls you might face (and how to avoid them!) and offer ideas on how to develop time management strategies.

Key academic elements of PhD study will also be covered, including what to consider when conducting fieldwork, analysing data and structuring the chapters of your thesis. Discussion will also cover your relationship with your supervisors, how you might approach writing up, what you can expect in the Viva and how it links to the thesis. The aim is to keep discussion informal, and from the perspective of what you as a PhD student can expect and how you might approach the challenges successfully.

Benefits
  • Increase your understanding of what to expect during the course of your studies, and how to develop general approaches to meet the challenges ahead
  • Prepare you for the academic requirements of your PhD, working through each academic stage and how you can plan successfully
  • Provide guidance on your overall objectives and how each element of your PhD will contribute to the structure of the chapters in your thesis, and how the thesis links to the Viva

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Workshop Dates

Monday 12th Nov 2018, 10 – 12 Book now
Monday 4th March 2019, 10 – 12 Book now

Preparing for the Viva Examination

Facilitator: Professor Anne Rixom A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesC2

About the Workshop

This session is aimed at you as a student towards the end of your PhD, with a focus on the Viva Voce examination, where you will be asked to defend your academic arguments and your contribution to originality. The approach is discussed from the perspective of you as the student and what you can expect once you have submitted your thesis. It will discuss how you can prepare yourself for the final examination and make the academic shift from writing up to defending your thesis.

Alongside general planning, the discussion will cover all the academic stages of viva preparation, including the key research regulations you need to know, the appointment of your examiners, how to prepare for potential questions, how to deal with the examiners, understanding what will happen during the Viva itself, including the role of the Internal and External Examiner and the Independent Viva Chair. The aim is to keep discussion informal, and from the perspective of what you as a PhD student can expect and how you might prepare yourself both academically and generally to achieve a successful Viva.

Benefits
  • Learn approaches to prepare both academically and more generally
  • Outline the academic criteria the examiners will use to judge the thesis and Viva
  • Prepare for the Viva examination itself, including engage with the Independent Chair and theExaminers

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 13th Nov 2018, 1 – 3pm Book now
Tuesday 5th March 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now

College of Arts: ‘The Viva – A Participatory Masterclass’

Facilitator: Prof Jane Chapman A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesC2

About the Workshop

This one-hour session provides essential information, tips, and recent reactions– from the viewpoint of an external examiner and supervisor, plus two students who have undergone the experience recently. At least half the time will be given over to questions. This participatory workshop, aimed at all PGR students who face a viva, will comprise:

  1. Fear and Loathing in Lincoln?Professor Jane Chapman will ask whether you should feel trepidation about, or welcome the help of the external?  Jane will talk about expectations and reality from her experiences as both examiner and supervisor, and the learning points these personal thoughts may provoke (whilst preserving anonymity at all times).
  2. Remembrance of Things Past?Once it’s over, is it best forgotten? Two Lincoln PhDs, in conversation, discuss their own memories and thoughts after the event.
  3. Speakeasy Q and A(“I hope she’ll be a speakeasy attendee – that’s the best thing a girl can be in the world”- Gatsby.) Pick up tips and voice concerns about the inevitable event to come.

 

Prof. Jane Chapman has examined PhDs at 8 different universities in England, Wales and Europe since 2009, in a variety of departments, including American Studies, Media, English, History, Journalism, and European Studies. She currently supervises a range of MRes., PhD and PhD by Practice students.

This session is suitable for Arts and Humanities PGR students.

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 1st May 2019, 1 – 2pm Book now

Qualitative Interviewing

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities  online orange

About the Workshop

This session will consider three different types of interviewing (structured, semi-structured and unstructured), but with a particular focus on semi-structured or ‘qualitative’ interviewing. Other issues covered will include the nature of interview questions, the design and structure of an effective interview schedule and the mechanics of conducting a successful interview (with different people and to deliver on our research aims). The idea is to share experiences, knowledge and potential ‘tricks-of-the-trade’. Time will be allowed for raising questions and/or issues pertinent to your own PhD studies.

The session has been hugely illuminating – thank you! The practical tips as to how to prepare an interview schedule, both for the purpose of the interview and for justifying the
approach in the methods section of the thesis, were particularly useful. The pointers on getting things through the ethics committee were also very helpful…A million thanks for all your fantastic insights – so gratefully received (Huddersfield).

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 13th November 2018, 7 – 9pm Book now

Questionnaires: An Introduction and Overview

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities

About the Workshop

Questionnaires – whether administered electronically or by more traditional means – are a widely used research method, including in the collection of qualitative data. This workshop considers the questionnaire, its context, and the kinds of data the questionnaire is capable of capturing. We will then explore the questionnaire structure: its layout and appearance; the ordering and types of question posed; as well as approaches to maximising response rates and ensuring validity in the data collected. In addition, consideration will be given to sampling techniques and guidance of questionnaire deployment.

Benefits
  • Consider the key elements of questionnaire
  • Understand the best circumstances to use them
  • Learn the strengths/weaknesses of this method

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 15th Nov 2018, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

About the Workshop

With REF and the competitive funding environment, impact forms an important part of the research landscape. However it can be a challenge to work out how to connect your research to changes, benefits and influence in the ‘real world’. This session is designed to help you understand what impact is, who may benefit from your research, how you can generate and capture impact and how you can meaningfully connect impact with own your research.

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 20th Nov 2018, 10 – 12 Book now
Wednesday 8th May 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now

Analysing Qualitative Data

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities  online orange

About the Workshop

This session will consider and discuss a range of issues relative to the microanalysis of qualitative data. Using example data throughout, issues covered will include the analyst’s perspective (the aims and nature of their engagement with the data), coding systems, how to choose extracts for analysis in a systematic fashion, the meaning and importance of interpretation, generalising from qualitative findings and various write-up issues, including the relationship between the analysis and discussion sections of a qualitative report and the creation of impact.

This session has allowed me to rethink how I will go about the analysis process in order to make the process easier on me…The session also allayed my fears about the idea of generalisation and how I can use my [data] extracts effectively to achieve ‘quality’ (Goldsmiths).

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 20th November 2018, 7 – 9pm Book now

Project Management for Researchers

Facilitator: Joanna Young A2B2C3

About the Workshop

Effective project management is essential for researchers throughout their career. A PhD is an excellent and unique degree that only a small number of people have the opportunity to experience, but it can also be challenging, frustrating and time consuming. Planning and managing the PhD effectively can make the process less stressful and ensure that students finish within their allotted timeframe.

Managing your own expectations and those of your supervisor can be challenging and it is important to frequently review your progress and discuss it. All PhD students must design and manage their own project, stick to a research plan, manage their time, present their work regularly and ensure that they are making sufficient progress.

This workshop will cover key stages in the PhD process and
introduce participants to various project management techniques
that they can use in their project. It will include sections on initiating your project, breaking your research down into sections, strategic planning, analysing your progress, optimising your time, risk management and communicating effectively with your supervisor(s).

Benefits
  • be introduced to the main project management stages and
    what each of these entail;
  • use a variety of project management techniques to plan, assess and optimise a project;
  • discuss the challenges & risks associated with a project &
    considered ways to mitigate these risks.

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 21st Nov 2019, 1.30 – 4.30pm Book now

Preparing for your Viva

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA C2  online orange

About the Workshop

The session aims to increase PGR students’ understanding of the oral examination process, to understand how an examiner will assess their thesis, to provide practical advice on how to prepare effectively and to build confidence in the student’s ability to perform well at the viva. The session may be of most benefit to students who are within a few months of being examined, but it can also help to increase the knowledge and confidence of students at earlier stages of their PhD journey.

The usual advice you get is be ‘positive about your work’, etc., [and] there is a lot of advice out there about what to do, but not many tell/show you how to do it. This session has taught me ‘how to be positive’ with practical examples…Thanks (Bath Spa).

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 27th November 2018, 7 – 9pm Book now

Questionnaires: Theory into Practice

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities

About the Workshop

This interactive, follow-up session is aimed at those planning to deploy questionnaires in their research.

Drawing on examples of questionnaires used in the field, participants will work on developing their own questionnaires (either from scratch or from designs they already have). Questionnaires should be accessible to the recipients it aims to collect data from, and capable of generating the desired quality of response. As such, the workshop will review features that can maximise the potential of a questionnaire.

Benefits
  • Explore and evaluate your early questionnaire designs
  • Pilot the development of your questionnaire
  • Learn from existing examples in the research field

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 28th Nov 2018, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Reflective Practices & the Research Process

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesA3D2

About the Workshop

The research process, whether it is for a master’s dissertation or a PhD, can be very challenging. Consequently, approaches that are able to support this process are much valued. Reflective practice is one such approach. It can encourage the development of analytical skills and critical thinking, help generate new insights and understanding, and afford a mechanism for capturing the decision-making process. Reflective writing can also represent a data source in itself.

Introducing the concept of reflective practice and what it offers, this session considers the various methods that can be used to facilitate such practice, including journal keeping and reflective discussion. It then considers the components of a reflective cycle – from description to interpretation and critical analysis, and on to the identification of points of learning and the drawing up of a set of actions or responses.

Examples of how this process can be applied to the work of the researcher are also explored, with participants encouraged to draw upon their own study experiences. The concept of reflexivity, concerned with locating the researcher in the research process, will also be considered. The session will conclude with some recommendations on effective reflective practice and by encouraging participants to reflect upon the approach that best suits them.

Benefits
  • Gain an understanding of reflective practice
  • Acquire an appreciation of what this approach can bring to the research process
  • Explore methods of reflective practice
  • Consider examples of how reflective practice can support research work
  • Identify a method of reflective practice that best suits

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 28th Nov 2018, 1 – 3pm Book now

The Focus Group in Academic Research

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1B2D1D2

About the Workshop

This session will examine the types of focus group used and their relative strengths and weaknesses. Drawing on examples of research projects, it will also consider when to use focus groups and the factors determining the number to conduct. A comparison with other forms of qualitative research, including interviews and observation, will also be made.

The session will explore the key phases involved in conducting successful focus group research. This will cover preparation work, including group selection, the development of a schedule of questions and the use of other data generating activities, before exploring the process of conducting the focus group. The workshop will conclude by exploring how other qualitative methods, as well as quantitative ones, can be used to complement the insights provided by focus groups, and the role that pilot studies can play in the testing of method and design.

Benefits
  • Appreciate the role of the focus group as a method of academic research
  • Recognise strengths and weaknesses of focus group research and when it is best applied
  • Consider which type of focus group would be most applicable
  • Appreciate the role of the pilot study in testing the focus group method and research design
  • Understand ethics in qualitative research and how these relate to focus group research

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Workshop Dates

Thursday 29th Nov 2018, 9.30 – 12.30 Book now

Interviews in Academic Research

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1B2D1

About the Workshop

This session will examine the types of research interview available, and the strengths and weaknesses of each. Consideration will also be given to some of the more widely used approaches to qualitative interviewing and when each of these approaches is best applied.

The session will examine the key phases involved in the interview process, covering preparation work – including interviewee selection and pre-interview communication – before exploring the process of conducting the interview itself. Attention will be given to the role of the interviewer and practices for generating good quality data. The post-interview phase, including transcription, data interpretation and analysis, will also be addressed, along with the subjects of data storage, data protection and research ethics. The workshop will conclude by exploring how other methods can be used to complement the insights provided by interviews and the role of a pilot study in testing research methods and design

Benefits
  • Appreciate the interview as a method of academic research
  • Consider the best type of research interview and understand the key phases of the process
  • Find other methods that could be used to complement the data generated by interviews
  • Appreciate the role of the pilot study in testing interview methods and research design
  • Realise the importance of ethics in qualitative research with regards to research interviews

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 12th Dec 2018, 1 – 3pm Book now

Completing Your PhD

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1A2A3B2

About the Workshop

Aimed at final year PhD students, this session deals with the final phase of the process and explores strategies to help ensure successful completion.

Consideration will first be given to reviewing and evaluating work produced thus far, locating any remaining gaps, and formulating a plan for completion. Attention will also be given to strategies for good time management and the identification of effective working practices. This component of the workshop will draw to a close by exploring how to make the most of your supervisors in the final stage of the PhD, as well as considering sources of additional support.

The second half of the session will address the subject of editing your PhD – for consistency, for style and content, and for accuracy. This will also include preparing for the viva and, in so doing, will draw upon advice offered by examiners. It will conclude by reflecting upon the range of skills and capabilities gained from the PhD process, and how to prepare for post PhD life.

Benefits
  • Be able to review what you have so far achieved and plan for submission
  • Recognise what working practices and writing strategies best suit you
  • Gain insights into the editing process
  • Get good preparation for your viva
  • Reflect on the range of transferable skills acquired from undertaking a PhD
  • Consider your post PhD plans

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Workshop Dates

Thursday 13th Dec 2018, 9.30 – 12.30 Book now
Thursday 14th March 2019, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Creative Thinking for Researchers

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesA3

About the Workshop

Arguably, the best researchers are also the most creative ones. Moreover, the view that creativity is an innate ability no longer holds sway. Instead, it is now recognised that creativity and creative thinking are skills that can be acquired. Having considered definitions and concepts, this works will explore the role and relevance of creative thinking in the research process. It will then examine approaches and techniques designed to facilitate creative thinking, as well as investigate the conditions likely to be most conducive to this process.

In the second part of this interactive workshop participants will be given an opportunity to practice some of the creative thinking techniques discussed. Whilst example challenges will be provided, participants are encouraged to bring along their own research challenge on which to test out some of their newly acquired skills. The final part of the workshop will explore how creative thinking can complement another key skill required by effective researchers – that of critical thinking.

  • Understand what constitutes creative thinking
  • Appreciate the role and relevance of creative thinking in the research process
  • Familiarise yourself with a variety of approaches and techniques for promoting creative thinking
  • Practice some of the techniques on a research based challenge
  • Consider how critical thinking can be used to complement the creative thinking process

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 23rd Jan 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now

The Collection & Analysis of Qualitative Data

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1A2C2

About the Workshop

For those using qualitative methods in their research, this interactive workshop considers the application of these methods to the research question, alongside the process of data collection and data analysis.

The workshop will consider the characteristics of qualitative data and its value to academic enquiry. A series of case studies will feature, providing participants with an opportunity to explore the most appropriate methods and research design to apply in each case. It will consider methods designed to ensure the generation of high quality data, exploring the various phases associated with data analysis, namely: transcription & data preparation, organisation & interpretation, and the identification of themes & categories. Consideration will be given to expressing trends and tendencies, as well as recognising the concepts of saturation and triangulation. Participants can then apply their learning to an excerpt from an interview transcript.

Benefits
  • Consider the characteristics of qualitative data
  • Realise the value of qualitative data to academic enquiry
  • Learn methods to ensure quality of data collected & the phases associated with data analysis
  • Apply your learning to the analysis of an excerpt from an interview transcript

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 13th Feb 2019, 9.30 – 12.30 Book now

Real World Research: Applying Research Methods to a Contemporary Research Challenge

Facilitator: Neil Raven C1D1D3

About the Workshop

This workshop will present participants with an opportunity to test and apply their knowledge of research methods to a contemporary and very real issue, and one likely to be familiar to many.

With this objective in mind, the session will begin with an introduction to the particular challenge – its history and character – as well as an exploration of why it requires attention and why it demands an improvement in our understanding. The scene having been set, participants will work in small groups to devise a suitable research design and identify an appropriate set of research methods capable of meeting this challenge.

The second part of the session will provide an opportunity for participants to assess and reflect on the ‘solutions’ they have devised. It will conclude with a consideration of the principles that underpin successful research practice.

Benefits
  • Consider how research methods are applied to a particular challenge
  • Gain an appreciation of how to develop a research schedule
  • Acquire an understanding of the principles that underpin effective research practice.

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Workshop Dates

Thursday 14th Feb 2019, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Observation & Photography in Academic Research

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1A3D3

About the Workshop

Although less widely adopted than a number of other research methods, observation and photography can offer new perspectives and insights. By defining these methods in the context of qualitative research, consideration will be given to the different approaches that can be taken in applying each method, including in the role given to the subjects of the study. A range of academic studies have used observation or employed photography and here participants will explore what distinguishes each of these methods from other approaches to the collection of qualitative data, and what their comparative strengths and weakness are. Informed by these insights, participants will reflect on what method would be most applicable to their own research.

The session will also explore the concept of research design and how each of these approaches could be deployed to address a research question. Here preparation is needed, including gaining permissions as well as addressing wider ethical issues. Attention will then turn to the data-gathering itself, before the post fieldwork phase is explored. The latter will address data storage, as well as analysis and interpretation. The session will conclude by examining the role of the pilot study in developing an approach to using these particular methods, as well as exploring how observation and photography could be incorporated into a mixed methods approach.

Benefits
  • Recognise the potential of observation and photography
  • Explore these methods in previous research studies
  • Recognise the strengths and weaknesses of each method
  • Apply this method to your research project
  • Understand the phases of using observation and photography
  • Learn the principles that underpin effective research practice with regards to observation/photography

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 26th Feb 2019, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Life Story Interviews

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1A3D2

About the Workshop

The life story interview has been described as a ‘research tool that is gaining much interest’. As a qualitative methodology it has the capability of generating rich, narrative data. Consequently, it is starting to be adopted across a number of disciplines. This workshop will begin by providing an introduction to the life story interview – the origins of this approach as well as its key characteristics. Attention will then turn to an exploration of its comparative strengths and limitations, before consideration is given to a case study illustrating its application. The next part of the workshop will explore techniques designed to maximise the quality of the data generated, including the role that the interviewer should play. The session will conclude with participants investigating how the life story interview – on its own or as part of a mixed methods approach – might be deployed in their own research work.

“Brilliant course as usual” – Emma Stanley, College of Science

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 26th Feb 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now

Qualitative Longitudinal Research: Concepts and Approaches

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1A2

About the Workshop

‘Conventional’ approaches to qualitative research have certain limitations. They tend to capture data at a particular moment in time. Whilst still new to a number of subject areas, qualitative longitudinal research offers an approach that has the potential to overcome this drawback. Having provided an introduction and explanation of what QLR encompasses, attention will turn to its potential advantages and strengths, as well as its limitations and the challenges associated with its application. Then some examples of QRL’s use in ‘the field’ will be given, with participants working in small groups to explore how it might be applied to a current area of concern to researchers. Concluding with participants considering how QLR could be deployed in their own research work.

Benefits
  • Understand what qualitative longitudinal research is and involves
  • Recognise the advantages and strengths of this approach
  • Appreciate the limitations and practical challenges associated with its use
  • Consider examples of its application
  • Assess the potential of this method in relation to your own research work

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Workshop Dates

Thursday 14th March 2019, 1 – 3pm Book now

Time Management, Motivation & Prioritisation

Facilitator: Joanna Young A2B2C3

About the Workshop

Time management and motivation is not about working more,
it’s about working smarter. This half day workshop is designed
specifically for researchers who are interested in developing their
time management skills and optimising their working hours. With
research activities, keeping up with the literature, publishing, tutoring and writing to consider, it can be challenging for researchers to fit everything in. How do you finish everything when you’re under pressure? Why is there never enough time to do what you want to do?

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to techniques
to optimise their time and discuss working patterns with others.
Participants will evaluate what they currently spend their time on,
what they would like to prioritise, how to measure their progress and how to keep motivated by considering what works best for them. The workshop will include individual exercises, short presentations from the instructor, group discussions and examples of good practice.

Benefits
  • knowledge of how to apply these techniques to their own
    personal working style;
  • an understanding of their priorities and how to optimise their time;
  • a time management strategy that can be adapted on a regular basis to suit their workload

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 14th May 2019, 09.30 – 12.30 Book now

Quantitative Research: A Basic Guide

Facilitator: Kimberly Bartholomew, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities  online orange

About the Workshop

This session will provide a conceptual and methodological introduction to quantitative research, which may be of particular use to PGR students considering the use of quantitative methods and analyses for the first time, or who feel in need of a ‘friendly’ and straightforward refresher session. Important quantitative concepts such as variables, hypotheses, probability (and p values), reliability, validity, and Type 1 and 2 errors will be defined and a tour will subsequently be taken through a range of statistical tests that can be used to examine both significant associations (correlation and regression) and significant differences (including the t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and MANOVA) in your data set.

Each statistical test will be mapped against the kind of research questions/hypotheses it is designed to answer and attendees will be shown how to run each test in principle, to interpret their results/output and to report the findings of each test in an appropriate format. If you’re intending to employ quantitative research techniques in your thesis, but currently feel uncertain about the correct procedure or method of data analysis, this session comes highly recommended.

As a first year PhD student I found this very helpful for my project, but also to learn about different quantitative methods which I may wish to implement or consider for the future. Highly recommend Kim for her fantastic teaching, making information very accessible for what is a very difficult topic (Huddersfield).

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 14th May 2019, 7 – 9pm Book now

An Introduction to Scale Development

Facilitator: Kimberly Bartholomew, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities  online orange

About the Workshop

This session will introduce students to the procedures used to develop reliable and valid scales, allowing them to accurately measure a variety of personal and social variables which would otherwise not be directly observable. Led by a tutor well-known for her scale development work in the context of self-determination theory – having designed and implemented both ‘The Controlling Coach Behaviour Scale’ (cited 166 times since 2010) and ‘The Psychological Need Thwarting Scale’ (cited 181 times since 2011) – the session will explore the scale development process from start to finish, beginning with item generation, and moving on to the piloting of items, through data collection, and concluding with a guide to various data analytic techniques, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, as well as appropriate tests of reliability and validity.

Thank you, it was great to get this overview of all the seven steps! And to have your practical examples really helped me [to] ground the information…Also great to hear someone speak about this who has actually gone through all the steps themselves (Roehampton).

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 21st May 2019, 7 – 9pm Book now

An Introduction to Structural Equation Modelling

Facilitator: Kimberly Bartholomew, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities  online orange

About the Workshop

Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) is a powerful multivariate statistical technique which enables researchers to examine several regression equations simultaneously. This session will provide an introduction to the key concepts involved in SEM, including latent, exogenous, and endogenous variables and their
graphical notation. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of both the measurement and structural model, before being taken on a step-by-step journey through the process of data analysis, stopping off on the way to consider issues of model specification, data collection, model estimation, model evaluation, and model modification. The session will conclude with a demonstration of how to interpret the output of an SEM analysis and to report the findings/revealed model correctly using both text and appropriate diagrams/figures.

A very good session as usual – lots of helpful information about the method. Extra resources are very helpful [as was the] clear explanation and step by step approach (Bournemouth).

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Workshop Dates

Tuesday 28th May 2019, 7 – 9pm Book now

Reflective Practices & the Research Process Part 2: The support workshop

Facilitator: Neil Raven A1RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilitiesA3D2

About the Workshop

Reflective practice can play an integral role in advancing the research process, including in the generation of new ideas, as well as in tackling the range of questions and conundrums postgraduate researchers encounter. The first workshop dedicated to this subject provided participants with an introduction to reflective practice, including the components of the reflective cycle and the methods that can be used to support such practice. Participants then explored an approach to reflective practice that would, potentially, suit them, and identified a set of actions they could take to become reflective researchers.

This follow-up workshop, which is designed to be both interactive and highly supportive, will provide participants with an opportunity to reflect on the practices they subsequently adopted, or sought to adopt. Consideration will then be given to the particular approaches participants found to be effective in supporting their masters and doctoral work, and the benefits that have arisen from their reflective practice. It will also consider the challenges encountered to reflective practice, and provide an opportunity for those attending to explore ways of counter these. The workshop will conclude by identify approaches that can help participants to gain even more from reflective practice.

Benefits
  • Explore the range of ways in which reflective practice can support and advance the research process
  • Reflect on their own reflective practices and identified way in which these can be further developed
  • Identify the next steps they need to take to develop as reflective researchers
  • Experience and benefit from a collaborative approach to reflective thinking
  • Gain an insight into questioning techniques that can help support and advance their own practice.

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Workshop Dates

Wednesday 5th June 2019, 1 – 4pm Book now

Mindfulness Based Strengths Practice for PhD students

Facilitators: Rebecca Park, Kelly Sisson, Roger Bretherton  B1

About the Workshop

This 8-week workshop/program is about engaging more deeply with life. The crux is self-awareness and self-discovery. It combines two powerful and popular approaches that are being used in schools, clinics, universities, scientific labs, and businesses worldwide: mindfulness meditation and character strengths. Emphasis is placed on exercises that are discussed and practiced each week. This course teaches the basics of mindfulness and of character strengths, and offers more advanced, practical ways to integrate the two. It presents a unique angle to living one’s best life, re-discovering happiness, and achieving goals, finding deeper meaning and life engagement, and coping with problems.

Book onto one of the information sessions below to find out more and get involved in the programme.

Benefits
  • Build a deeper knowledge of the best qualities in people
  • Cultivate your strengths awareness and strengths use.
  • Boost mindfulness as an always-available approach to use in your life
  • Offers several concrete practices to boost happiness & manage stress/difficulties.
  • Increase your happiness, engagement, meaning, purpose whilst researching
  • Build better relationships, and improved stress/problem management

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Managing your Supervisor

Facilitator: Kevin Byron B1B3C1D1

About the Workshop

To maintain an effective working relationship with their supervisor, Ph.D students need to be aware of a number of factors that affect the dynamics of this relationship over time. Initially the student is dependent on the supervisor for acquiring the skills to transition from being a consumer of knowledge, as in their undergraduate studies, to someone who is creating new knowledge through their research. In the longer term the student acquires more autonomy in this respect, and is able to exert more influence in the relationship with a supervisor. To manage this changing relationship and its dynamics requires time and effort on both sides, though students can benefit greatly in the early stages by equipping themselves with listening skills, assertiveness (and when to apply it), and the science of influence and negotiation. Attendees at the workshop will also be:

Benefits
  • familiar with the University guidelines for supervision
  • more aware of the factors than can affect supervisor-student relationships
  • equipped with an action plan they can apply to their own supervisions
  • able to try simple assertiveness techniques

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A Comparison of Qualitative Methods

Facilitator: Simon Watts, UEA RDF Domain A: Knowledge and intellectual abilities  online orange

About the Workshop

This session will compare and contrast the aims, data collection preferences, analytic style, limitations and appropriate usage of four different qualitative methods – grounded theory, thematic analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis and narrative analysis – in order to identify the types of research questions to which each method is best suited. The possibility of conducting by person or case analyses using qualitative data will also be considered.

A useful session [which] provided an introduction to qualitative analysis, especially for novice researchers confused by all the terminology – particularly the bits about methodology that we ‘glaze over’ when reading texts. This begins to make sense. I could do with more (Greenwich).

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About the Workshop

On completion of this workshop you will be able to:

  • Find books and journal articles using the Library website
  • Create an effective search strategy
  • Know how to locate the full text of journal articles

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About the Workshop

This workshop is intended to aid those seeking legal information for their research. It will cover the main library resources available that contain legal materials and information useful for study.

Benefits
  • Be familiar with the main legal databases
  • Know how to search for cases and legislation using the legal databases
  • Identify authoritative legal information that is freely available on the internet

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Accessing Archives

Facilitator: Hope Williard 

About the Workshop

This workshop provides tools and ideas for finding and using archives in your research. On completion of this workshop you should be able to:
• Consider how archives might be useful to your research
• Understand some of the practicalities of locating and using archives
• Use online tools to find and explore an archive related to your project

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Search Strategies for Systematic Reviews

Facilitator: Marishona, Ortega, Academic Subject Librarian A1

About the Workshop

Systematic reviews use transparent and replicable methods to locate, evaluate and synthesize all research relevant to a particular question.  They are most commonly found in health, medicine and psychology.  Therefore, this workshop will focus on developing a search strategy for identifying literature from these disciplines.

This workshop will cover:
  • what is a systematic review?
  • Learn key features of the systematic review process
  • Identify appropriate databases, keywords and subject headings (e.g. Mesh)
  • Planning a search using the PICO and SPICE frameworks
  • Building an effective search strategy
  • Explore search techniques including truncation, wildcards and proximity operators
  • Translating searches across different databases

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About the Workshop

There may be information within the cathedral library that could be used for your research. This tour includes the medieval Library of 1422 and the 10,000 rare book collection covers every subject imaginable, including homeopathy, philosophy, music, astronomy. There may be material within the libraries that would enrich your research, so please contact the Special Collections Librarian for

assistance. The modern reference collection can be consulted freely but manuscripts and rare books require an academic reference from your tutor.

Due to the medieval architecture, there is sadly no disabled access for the tour.

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Why Do I Need a P-Value?

Facilitator: Laura Pearson & Phil Assheton A1

About the Workshop

In this interactive workshop, we will look at a very simple dataset in SPSS and see how a t-test saves us from making a catastrophically bad decision.  The main aim is a deeper understanding of what a t-test (or p-values in general) really tells you, but also to start to think about exploring data in SPSS, and have a go at running and interpreting a t-test and p-values.

Benefits
  • Gain a deeper understanding of what a t-test, or p-values, really tell you
  • Explore data in SPSS
  • Practice running and interpreting a t-test and p-values

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How to Start Analysing Data in SPSS

Facilitator: Laura Pearson & Phil Assheton A1

About the Workshop

In this interactive workshop, we will take a look at some real data from the General Social Survey, and build a set of steps for investigating that data.  We will chiefly focus on different types of graphs and the p-values that can give those graphs credibility.  It is highly recommended to attend “Why Do I Need a p-value?” first, but this is designed to be a standalone workshop if you can’t make it to that.

Benefits
  • Practically investigate actual data in SPSS
  • Determine what gives certain data credibility
  • Create steps transferable to your own practice

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How To Get My Own Data into SPSS

Facilitator: Laura Pearson & Phil Assheton A1

About the Workshop

In this interactive workshop you will get the opportunity to enter some data from the General Social Survey into SPSS.  The data you will be entering has been selected to expose you to the full set of features in SPSS’ “Variable View”, so by the end you should have plenty of ideas of how to set up your own data in SPSS.

Benefits
  • Learn how to set up your own data in SPSS
  • Get practical, hands-on experience of the process
  • Gain knowledge of the features of SPSS Variable View

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Getting Started in R

Facilitator: Phil Assheton A1

About the Workshop

A hands on beginner’s introduction to the R environment. This is for you if you don’t know where to start. We hope you’ll leave this workshop with the confidence to explore R further.

Benefits
  • Get an introduction to the R environment
  • Gain the confidence to explore and use R in your research

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