Great Lives: James Kakalios – The Physics of Superhereos | 7 Sept

JK-Head-Shot-397x600
Staff and students are invited to attend the next Great Lives lecture, to be given by James Kakalios on The Physics of Superheroes on 7 September 2017.

Physics professor, bestselling author, and dynamic storyteller James Kakalios will bring the world of Physics to life in a unique talk using superheroes from well-known comic books to illustrate fundamental physics principles for young and old minds alike. The audience will be invited to ponder whether superhero, the Flash becomes heavier as he tries to run at the speed of light, the chemical composition of Captain America’s shield, and who is faster: Superman or the Flash amongst explaining other predicaments our most loved capped crusaders get themselves into.

Continue reading “Great Lives: James Kakalios – The Physics of Superhereos | 7 Sept”

What I learned from 100 days of rejection

Jia Jiang adventures boldly into a territory so many of us fear: rejection. By seeking out rejection for 100 days — from asking a stranger to borrow $100 to requesting a “burger refill” at a restaurant — Jiang desensitised himself to the pain and shame that rejection often brings and, in the process, discovered that simply asking for what you want can open up possibilities where you expect to find dead ends.

Find out more by watching the informative video below:


Continue reading “What I learned from 100 days of rejection”

Participants needed for exercise physiology research study

Recruitment-flyer-iHealth-534x800
“We are looking for healthy, active, male participants (aged 18-50 years), to take part in an exercise physiology research study within the School of Sport & Exercise Science.”

This study will examine some of the ways that the cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of submaximal and maximal treadmill exercise are currently determined, whilst providing you with information regarding your current fitness levels that may be beneficial to your training/exercise (i.e. maximum heart rate and aerobic capacity/fitness).

Involvement in the study will require just one visit to the Human Performance Centre laboratories between August and October to run on a treadmill across a range of intensities (i.e. gradually progressing from walking to maximum run speed) – with performance, physiological and psychological measures taken throughout. This will take between 60-75 minutes in total.

Continue reading “Participants needed for exercise physiology research study”

What happens when you have a disease doctors can’t diagnose?

Five years ago, TED Fellow Jennifer Brea became progressively ill with myalgic encephalomyelitis, commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness that severely impairs normal activities and on bad days makes even the rustling of bed sheets unbearable. In this poignant talk, Brea describes the obstacles she’s encountered in seeking treatment for her condition, whose root causes and physical effects we don’t fully understand, as well as her mission to document through film the lives of patients that medicine struggles to treat.

Find out more by watching the informative video below:

Continue reading “What happens when you have a disease doctors can’t diagnose?”

Inside the Mind of a Master Procrastinator

Tim Urban knows that procrastination doesn’t make sense, but he’s never been able to shake his habit of waiting until the last minute to get things done. In this hilarious and insightful talk, Urban takes us on a journey through YouTube binges, Wikipedia rabbit holes and bouts of staring out the window — and encourages us to think harder about what we’re really procrastinating on, before we run out of time.

Find out more by watching the informative video below:

Continue reading “Inside the Mind of a Master Procrastinator”

A Robot that Runs and Swims like a Salamander

Roboticist Auke Ijspeert designs biorobots, machines modeled after real animals that are capable of handling complex terrain and would appear at home in the pages of a sci-fi novel. The process of creating these robots leads to better automata that can be used for fieldwork, service, and search and rescue. But these robots don’t just mimic the natural world — they help us understand our own biology better, unlocking previously unknown secrets of the spinal cord.

Find out more by watching the informative video below:

Continue reading “A Robot that Runs and Swims like a Salamander”